Ok friends. I feel like I need some sort of “weekly roundup” for all the things I read and don’t get to talk about.

I decide, on a whim, right now, that this will be a weekly event and I’ll try to attend. I’m going to call it Bazar Pazar. Pazar is Turkish for “Sunday” and is the day when the weekly p(b)azar is held in the city centers. You can find anything your heart desires and quite a bit you never knew existed. So, in the spirit of the Sunday smorgasbord, here are things I’ve read and/or interacted with this week. Its a record for me, of sorts, and a peek into my mind, if you will. If you think this is boring, totally understand. Just skip to the last link and watch some beautiful Turkey fly by.

1.)If you havent’ looked it over yet, this article on kids’ breakfast food is insightful and full of good humor. Perfect for a read over my own breakfast: a banana, peanut butter, soy milk smoothie and coffee. Not so very Turkish today, I admit.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/08/magazine/eaters-all-over.html?smid=tw-nytimes&_r=1

2.) Another great breakfast read, especially if you happen to have your phone and tablet open next to your laptop. Guilty… I swear I was a luddite till I moved half-way across the world and realized that technology allows me such an amazing connectivity. Anyway, maybe this explains why I’m bad at keeping in touch? The Dunbar # restricts me! (Just kidding, I take full responsibility for being a terrible pen pal)
http://www.newyorker.com/science/maria-konnikova/social-media-affect-math-dunbar-number-friendships

3.) Ok, this one is probably not a breakfast read. This is a pretty well reasoned article (in my opinion) about the current situation on the Turkish/Syrian border. All of this is tough for me to parse out. The layers and complexities of the current situation in Turkey are boggling, but I’m trying to stay informed. Anyway, check it out:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/10/world/middleeast/turkish-support-of-coalition-fighting-isis-centers-on-border-buffer-zone-.html

4.) I’m pretty sure my Uncle Mike posted this one and, though short, its a pretty helpful concept. In the classroom, Instead of doing “drills” we can offer Challenges! I’m trying to adopt/reinforce this mentality in my classes, especially since the Turkish education system is 100% regulated by standardized tests. Most of my students have studied English for 7-8 years and yet can produce only the most basic sentences. They can fill in blanks, answer T/F, and do scan-trons till the cows come home (not the pigs, obvs) but they struggle, valiently and cheerfully, with any Production of English. So, all that to say, I want to encourage them to see language learning as fun and empowering. Ugh, more on that later, I’m sure. Ok, here it is:
http://thetalentcode.com/2014/10/06/stop-using-drills-start-using-challenges/

5.) Josh Ritter. So beautiful. So honest. His way with words is entrancing to me. Thats all.
http://www.thebluegrasssituation.com/read/josh-ritter-talks-far-out-next-album-bringing-family-tour-and-working-bob-weir

6.) Speaking of beautiful, I’m so excited to start reading Robinson’s newest. Thanks Katie Smith for reminding me that it came out on October 7th! Anyway, I’m super torn because I don’t think it prudent to read Lila on my iPad but the nearest American bookstore is, uh, probably in Russia actually. Maybe I’ll wait till November when I head to Istanbul and will pick up a copy then:
http://www.amazon.com/Lila-A-Novel-Marilynne-Robinson/dp/0374187614/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1413095774&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=Marrilyn+Robinson

7.) And finally, TURKEY. You all should watch this and then come visit me asap: K THANKS. Also, feel free to laugh at the first 20 seconds. I did.

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